A Fools Guide to sharing Becoming Fools

A Fools Guide to Sharing Becoming Fools

We understand it can be overwhelming with all of the different social networks and all the ways to share something, even when you’re eager to share it! And we know many of you have asked us, “how can I spread the word about Becoming Fools?” So we decided to make it easy for you. Below we provided all of the current social media outlets we are active on, our home pages, hashtags to use and even some sample messaging. We hope this will make it easier and more effective to share your excitement about Becoming Fools and the issues of homelessness and at-risk youth the film addresses.

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Our Homepages

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Instagram
Youtube
Vimeo
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Hashtags and ID’s

@Athentikos
#BecomingFools
#atriskyouth
#homelessyouth
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Sample Messaging

Just copy [Cntrl+C] and paste [Cntrl+V] any of the text blocks below into Facebook, Twitter, Google+, any social media outlet where you can share content.

It took @Athentikos over 2 years to produce it. Now’s the time to launch it. #BecomingFools http://bit.ly/19tSWNl

#BecomingFools is finished. Help @Athentikos launch the screening tour! http://bit.ly/19tSWNl

Help #atriskyouth by supporting the #BecomingFools Screening Tour http://bit.ly/19tSWNl @Athentikos

#BecomingFools is complete, help @Athentikos now get an audience to see it and raise awareness of #homelessyouth http://bit.ly/19tSWNl

A Fools Guide to Sharing Becoming Fools

A Child’s Barrier to Education

“Homelessness is not a sufficient reason to separate students from the mainstream school environment”…argues legislation introduced last month.

On April 25, 2013, U.S. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) introduced “The Educational Success for Children and Youth Without Homes Act of 2013”.  This legislation aims to strengthen parts of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act originally passed and signed into law in 1987.  The McKinney-Vento Act aimed to protect the right to education of homeless youth.  This act defines homeless children and youth as “any individual who lacks fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence.”  This includes children “hotelin” with their families as well as:

  • Children sharing housing due to economic hardship or loss of housing;
  • Children living in “motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camp grounds due to lack of alternative accommodations”
  • Children living in “emergency or transitional shelters”
  • Children “awaiting foster care placement”
  • Children whose primary nighttime residence is not ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation (e.g. park benches, etc.)
  • Children living in “cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations…”

A Child's Barrier to Education

Children across the country slip out of the education system everyday.  To address this problem, it is important to empower education systems to identify and enable the youth that fall into these categories and slip out of school.  The Educational Success for Children and Youth Without Homes Act of 2013 proposes to increase the federal protection of and expand services for these children.

As our previous blog Hotelin at Disney: A New Way of Living explains, some families living in hotels are renting out one of their beds to make a little extra cash.  Under recent legislation families living in “doubled-up” arrangements in houses, apartments and hotels would be included under the definition of homeless.  A Huffington Post article cited in the last blog entry states, “As of now, the only homeless people eligible for help from the Department of Housing and Urban Development are those who live in shelters or on the streets, with narrow exceptions. The law would add around 700,000 kids to the thousands who already meet the department’s definition of homelessness.”

A Child's Barrier to Education

A Child's Barrier to Education

“Homelessness is not a sufficient reason to separate students from the mainstream school environment”…argues legislation introduced last month.

On April 25, 2013, U.S. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) introduced “The Educational Success for Children and Youth Without Homes Act of 2013”.  This legislation aims to strengthen parts of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act originally passed and signed into law in 1987.  The McKinney-Vento Act aimed to protect the right to education of homeless youth.  This act defines homeless children and youth as “any individual who lacks fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence.”  This includes children “hotelin” with their families as well as:

  • Children sharing housing due to economic hardship or loss of housing;
  • Children living in “motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camp grounds due to lack of alternative accommodations”
  • Children living in “emergency or transitional shelters”
  • Children “awaiting foster care placement”
  • Children whose primary nighttime residence is not ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation (e.g. park benches, etc.)
  • Children living in “cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations…”

A Child's Barrier to Education

Children across the country slip out of the education system everyday.  To address this problem, it is important to empower education systems to identify and enable the youth that fall into these categories and slip out of school.  The Educational Success for Children and Youth Without Homes Act of 2013 proposes to increase the federal protection of and expand services for these children.

As our previous blog Hotelin at Disney: A New Way of Living explains, some families living in hotels are renting out one of their beds to make a little extra cash.  Under recent legislation families living in “doubled-up” arrangements in houses, apartments and hotels would be included under the definition of homeless.  A Huffington Post article cited in the last blog entry states, “As of now, the only homeless people eligible for help from the Department of Housing and Urban Development are those who live in shelters or on the streets, with narrow exceptions. The law would add around 700,000 kids to the thousands who already meet the department’s definition of homelessness.”

A Child's Barrier to Education

Hotelin at Disney: A New Way of Living

Uprooting your life after one storm is bad luck.  Displacement from a second natural disaster is unimaginable, but unfortunately this is the reality for many families.  Even families with savings accounts and plans for emergency situations can find themselves unprotected from the devastating effects of bad weather, and in certain circumstances, homeless.

A recent article from the Huffington Post describes one family’s unfortunate journey to homelessness caused by natural disasters:  “This family had started out in New Orleans, lost its home in Katrina, moved to Nashville and lost that home in the floods. At that point the parents figured they might as well leave the next choice of destination to their 7-year-old daughter. And so they’d arrived on the steps of Disney, where they [are] now renting one of the two beds in their room to a Vietnam vet for a few extra dollars.”

Photo provided by The Associated Press

This article focuses on the growing issue of homeless families living in hotels around the Disney World Resorts in Central Florida.  “According to the U.S. Department of Education, at least 2,000 children live in the hotels of Central Florida…”

Central Florida attracts families in times of economic hardship because to some it is “the land of perfect weather and plentiful paychecks”.  But shortly after arriving, these families find themselves in a very different world than what they expected.

Without finding a secure job, “[these] families run up a big bill and move to another hotel down the road. They called it “hotelin’.”

The Huffington Post article states, “For homeless families the lack of stability is arguably the biggest obstacle on the path to a better life.”  The lack of stability is also a long-lasting and devastating effect on the children in these families.  The article sites several supporting studies that highlight the effects on the development of a child and the risk factors of an unstable environment.  A study conducted by the University of Chicago found that homeless children may move 3-4 times per year, and each move sets the child back about 6 months in their schooling.

Another study published by the American Academy of Pediatrics found that “children who live in poverty often have higher-than-normal levels of stress hormones, which can actually warp the architecture of the brain in ways that make these children more vulnerable to anxiety and depression and more prone to poor decision-making, and thus more likely to remain poor and to raise kids who will themselves remain poor.”  This instability creates more instability argues the article “Bringing up a child in the chaotic conditions of poverty must be something like building a skyscraper on quicksand. Instability begets instability begets instability.”

Omaha Film Festival / Press Release

Athentikos heads to the Omaha Film Festival this week to premiere “Becoming Fools.” For those of you in the area (or know someone in Omaha), please join us in celebrating this story. Here is the press release for the film.

Filmmakers inspire hope in Guatemala by “Becoming Fools”

Non-profit organization, Athentikos, premieres feature-length documentary Becoming Fools at Omaha Film Festival on March 10, 2013 at 12pm.

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Spring Hill, TN (WEB) February 26, 2013 — Athentikos, a non-profit film production organization that exposes need and inspires hope through the art of story, is premiering their second documentary, Becoming Fools at the Omaha Film Festival on March 10, 2013 at 12pm.  This will be the first among many film festival premieres throughout the spring and summer.

Becoming Fools is the ultimate underdog story of comedy healing tragedy. Becoming Fools documents the lives of Guatemalan street youth who are joined by professional entertainers in preparing for a theatrical event to honor their fallen hero, Italo, whose passion for these children started a movement teaching the art of clowning as a way to rehabilitate lives and to show these children a father’s love.

“Clowns are not just associated with children, clowns really are children. So learning to clown helps reconnect these youth with their stolen childhood,” said Director, Scott Owen Moore. “Becoming Fools is a rally cry to take a risk and join in the effort to end child homelessness. We’ve already seen the power of this story to unite people in this important cause.”

The filming of Becoming Fools further ignited a movement in Guatemala set to empower youth living in the streets to rise above their situation.  Over 20 diverse organizations now meet monthly to discuss ways they can work together in serving street youth.

Athentikos hopes to premiere Becoming Fools throughout the US during a fall & winter screening tour.

See the trailer here.

Contact: Scott Moore / smoore@athentikos.com / Athentikos / 615-852-8326

Hot or Cold? Challenges in Any Weather

Hot or Cold? Challenges in Any Weather

Homelessness is a global problem.  Unpredictable and harsh conditions create unique challenges in each climate for people living without shelter.  Even the weather here in Tennessee can be challenging to the homeless population.

Although the specific focus of Becoming Fools is concerned with homeless youth in Guatemala City, but our hope is that Becoming Fools would inspire people to action in their local communities around the world.  With this blog, and many to follow, we hope to educate and encourage people not only in Nashville and Guatemala, but people in Michigan, people in Canada, people in Australia, Oregon, California and all around the world to join the movement in making a difference in this struggle.

Hot or Cold? Challenges in Any Weather

Hot or Cold?

Which is worse?  The freezing cold, or the sweltering heat?  I think even my Mom and I disagree on this question because everyone has their own preference and tolerance.  But which condition is more dangerous for someone living on the streets?  The answer to this question greatly depends on where you live.  Here in Tennessee, where we experience true seasons, both could be similarly threatening to those in the streets.  Nashville Rescue Mission mentions the often-overlooked dangers of extreme heat:

In contrast to those families planning summer vacations, the homeless are faced with survival concerns: how to stay cool and how to stay hydrated. The homeless can be particularly vulnerable to heat waves because they cannot easily take steps to protect themselves, such as staying in air-conditioned places, avoiding direct sun and drinking plenty of water. Some of those living on the streets might be under the influence of drugs, alcohol or suffering from mental illness and are not thinking clearly. Add this to heat and dehydration and you have a lethal combination.

In Howell, Michigan the United Methodist Church opens their doors to the homeless during the winter to provide food and shelter from harsh weather.  The combination of below-freezing temperatures and snow in Northern states present often fatal conditions.

Although each season presents it’s own unique set of challenges to people living in the streets, all require assistance.  Next time you adjust the thermostat in your home, think twice about what it would be like to not have one.  As Nashville Rescue Mission puts it, “Those with low or fixed incomes are also at risk. Many of them are forced to choose between eating or turning on their air conditioner”.