Reparando for Education and Exhibition Uses

The film Reparando is about hope and redemption at it’s core and we’ve been thrilled to see the effects of what a film can have on a community, even a country! And now that there’s even more ways to watch the film, such as through digital downloads, online streaming with Hulu and Amazon Prime and yes, we still sell physical dvd’s as well, there’s even a greater chance the film can impact more people and bring more awareness to what’s happening in Guatemala.

But what some of you may not know is that we offer Reparando to be seen in other settings than just your home. Because purchasing the film in the before mentioned manner is for home use only we wanted to have a chance for individuals to show the film in churches and other organizational settings, even classrooms! This is why we offer two different licensing options for the film, an education license and an exhibition license. Let us explain:

[one_half] Reparando – Educational License
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[one_half last=last] Reparando – Exhibition License
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An education license allows an institution to purchase the film for the purpose of using the film as an education resource. The license is a one time purchase and is held by the institution indefinitely. The one restriction about the education license is that it cannot be used for fundraising purposes. If an organization wishes to use Reparando as a way to help raise funding, then they would need to purchase the exhibition license.

An exhibition license for Reparando allows any organization to use the film for the sole purpose of raising money for that organization. The license is granted for one month and becomes active at the time of the first event. From that first event a licensee can use the film multiple times for 30 days. After the 30 days the license expires. If an organization wishes to use the film again another license must be purchased. At the end of each term the licensee must submit information of the total money raised and 10% is collected from that organization.

Funding that Athentikos raises from the licenses allows us to continue to make the Reparando available in these ways and bring greater visibility to the issues and hope in Guatemala. If you still have questions about licensing Reparando

A Child’s Barrier to Education

“Homelessness is not a sufficient reason to separate students from the mainstream school environment”…argues legislation introduced last month.

On April 25, 2013, U.S. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) introduced “The Educational Success for Children and Youth Without Homes Act of 2013”.  This legislation aims to strengthen parts of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act originally passed and signed into law in 1987.  The McKinney-Vento Act aimed to protect the right to education of homeless youth.  This act defines homeless children and youth as “any individual who lacks fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence.”  This includes children “hotelin” with their families as well as:

  • Children sharing housing due to economic hardship or loss of housing;
  • Children living in “motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camp grounds due to lack of alternative accommodations”
  • Children living in “emergency or transitional shelters”
  • Children “awaiting foster care placement”
  • Children whose primary nighttime residence is not ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation (e.g. park benches, etc.)
  • Children living in “cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations…”

A Child's Barrier to Education

Children across the country slip out of the education system everyday.  To address this problem, it is important to empower education systems to identify and enable the youth that fall into these categories and slip out of school.  The Educational Success for Children and Youth Without Homes Act of 2013 proposes to increase the federal protection of and expand services for these children.

As our previous blog Hotelin at Disney: A New Way of Living explains, some families living in hotels are renting out one of their beds to make a little extra cash.  Under recent legislation families living in “doubled-up” arrangements in houses, apartments and hotels would be included under the definition of homeless.  A Huffington Post article cited in the last blog entry states, “As of now, the only homeless people eligible for help from the Department of Housing and Urban Development are those who live in shelters or on the streets, with narrow exceptions. The law would add around 700,000 kids to the thousands who already meet the department’s definition of homelessness.”

A Child's Barrier to Education

A Child's Barrier to Education

“Homelessness is not a sufficient reason to separate students from the mainstream school environment”…argues legislation introduced last month.

On April 25, 2013, U.S. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) introduced “The Educational Success for Children and Youth Without Homes Act of 2013”.  This legislation aims to strengthen parts of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act originally passed and signed into law in 1987.  The McKinney-Vento Act aimed to protect the right to education of homeless youth.  This act defines homeless children and youth as “any individual who lacks fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence.”  This includes children “hotelin” with their families as well as:

  • Children sharing housing due to economic hardship or loss of housing;
  • Children living in “motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camp grounds due to lack of alternative accommodations”
  • Children living in “emergency or transitional shelters”
  • Children “awaiting foster care placement”
  • Children whose primary nighttime residence is not ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation (e.g. park benches, etc.)
  • Children living in “cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations…”

A Child's Barrier to Education

Children across the country slip out of the education system everyday.  To address this problem, it is important to empower education systems to identify and enable the youth that fall into these categories and slip out of school.  The Educational Success for Children and Youth Without Homes Act of 2013 proposes to increase the federal protection of and expand services for these children.

As our previous blog Hotelin at Disney: A New Way of Living explains, some families living in hotels are renting out one of their beds to make a little extra cash.  Under recent legislation families living in “doubled-up” arrangements in houses, apartments and hotels would be included under the definition of homeless.  A Huffington Post article cited in the last blog entry states, “As of now, the only homeless people eligible for help from the Department of Housing and Urban Development are those who live in shelters or on the streets, with narrow exceptions. The law would add around 700,000 kids to the thousands who already meet the department’s definition of homelessness.”

A Child's Barrier to Education