The Sound of the Rain Needs No Translation

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Between November 10th and November 15th, I taught a creative writing and painting workshop at Athentikos’ I Am Art camp in Guatemala City, Guatemala. Several artists from the United States banded together, left the comfort of their homes and family, and journeyed into the heart of Zone 18, an area of Guatemala City riddled with violence, poverty, and oppression.

In my creative writing workshop, we explored the relationship between writing and prayer. There is an obvious connection in which both are expressive, a relationship between a speaker/writer and a listener/reader. Prayer can often be thought of as a letter. Above all else, writing, like prayer, is a form of communication. And to truly communicate, one must not only speak or write, one must also listen.

This side of prayer and writing is often overlooked, because when we think about prayer and writing we think about words, content, message. Even when we listen, we imagine or think in words. The words will often get in the way of listening. I don’t know how many times I’ve forgotten something my wife told me get at the store.

“You don’t listen to me,” she says.

“I just forgot. I heard you. I’m sorry.”

Hearing and listening are two separate entities. When we write, we may hear the world around us but never truly listen to it. This, I believe, is what separates great writers from good writers. Listening goes beyond the ears and into the heart. Listening transcends words and language. The sound of rain needs no translation.

Contemporary poetry aims to listen. It accepts the flaws of humankind and of language, and learns to dance and sing amidst it all. It is the music underneath and beyond. I was hesitant about doing a creative writing workshop for the Guatemalan youth due to their age and the language barrier, but I was pleasantly surprised by their enthusiasm and interest; everything fell into place.

On the first day, I was dealing with a fever. I took my class out into the forest behind the main complex and asked them to sit in silence and to listen for something that they would normally overlook or disregard as unimportant. My illness played a significant role in this decision, but it was the perfect way to begin. Writing arises first from true silence, from sitting within the world. Goethe says that “poetry is a secular gospel.” Religious groups, especially Christians, shy away from this word: secular.  But the secular and the sacred go hand-in-hand. They cannot be separated.

“[Religion] makes itself the ultimate and despises the secular realm. It makes its myths and doctrines, its rites and laws into ultimates and persecutes those who do not subject themselves to it. … This is the reason for a passionate reaction of the secular world against religion, a reaction which has tragic consequences for the secular realm itself. For the religious and the secular realm are in the same predicament. Neither of them should be in separation from the other, and both should realize that their very existence as separated is an emergency, that both of them are rooted in the experience of ultimate concern.”

Theology of Culture, Paul Tillich

This idea of opposites-in-harmony has been on my mind over the past few months. I’ve been criticized by family and friends for taking an apophatic stance on God and religion, because people tend to prefer answers and clarity, shying away from the abstract and the obscure. But clarity and obscurity need each other, just as the light needs the darkness. Where else could it shine into?

I do not want to say that we brought light into the darkness of Zone 18. The light was already there. Children are the sparks that will shine through any darkness. What was our purpose being there? If nothing else, to bring kindling, to fan the flames, to ignite another spark.

“Put ragged clothes upon your back and sleep upon the ground,
And tell police about your rights as they drag you down,
And ask them as they lead you to some deserted door,
Yes, I know you’re set for fightin’, but what are you fightin’ for?

But the hardest thing I’ll ask you, if you will only try
Is take your children by their hands and look into their eyes
And there you’ll see the answer you should have seen before
If you’ll win the wars at home, there’ll be no fighting anymore.”

What Are You Fighting For? by Phil Ochs

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Embracing Conflict Amplifies Authenticity

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Embracing conflict amplifies authenticity. We spent six months developing the I Am Art curriculum and empowering our artists to leverage it in their art forms. Our goal was to empower these children to see themselves as beautiful art of the I AM, filled with purpose in God’s greater story.

We knew that many of these children have experienced horrible conflict (family members abducted or killed, physical abuse, extreme poverty … the list goes on). We wanted to explore conflict in a safe way, without unnecessarily and dangerously unraveling personal conflict in the children’s lives. After much reflection, we decided the healthiest way to achieve this goal was to introduce conflict into the creative process.

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Each morning in large group, the children learned the theme of the day through stories and various group activities. During the first two days of camp, artists led children to create beautiful and personal works of art. Seeing the children glowing with pride and excitement was emotional in itself. But it was even more emotional to know what was coming on day three …

On the third day, we introduced conflict. Each workshop altered (and some even “destroyed”) the art that was so meticulously crafted on days one and two. Even though we knew it was coming, it was painful to watch the children’s expressions when they were told their artwork would be “broken”. In Amelia’s workshop, children were asked to cover their self portraits with black pastel. Some children tried to hide their art. Some cried a bit. For a moment, we thought we had made a terrible mistake by including this method in our curriculum. It was tough to rest in the tension of conflict. But that is where transformation began …

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Children made the connection between the symbolic conflict and the conflict of their personal lives, and they felt safe enough to share. Several children shared stories of abuse as their peers listened carefully. The creative conflict provided a cathartic way for the youth to explore and express the pain in their hearts. But we didn’t leave it there …

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The next day we explored God’s greater story of redemption to create beauty from ashes. … Beginning with Maria the Doll Lady featured in Reparando, who shared details about rescuing doll parts from the dump and making them new. Then the kids put the theme of the day into action. Each workshop repurposed their broken artwork into even more beautiful creations. Collages that were cut into pieces the day before were reworked into a beautiful profiles. Self portraits that were covered with black were scraped and colored again with even brighter colors. Masks that were covered with black clay were cleaned and made into creative sculptures. We could see the light in the eyes of the children. Again, they made the connection to their own personal lives … Beauty from ashes.

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The curriculum metaphorically walked the children through the story of creation, conflict, and Christ’s redemption. The artwork became an outward expression of a deep spiritual truth. It was profoundly humbling to experience creative ideas lived through the artists in ways that inspired and empowered these children to heal and dream. And the healing river flowed in both directions, also transforming artists with new visions of hope and creative purpose. We were woven into a greater story than we ever could have imagined … a story which began long before we arrived … and will continue for generations to come …. Art of the I Am.

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The Color Wheel of Emotions

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It’s difficult to sum up the contrast of feelings and experiences related to I Am Art. In my workshop, we studied mixed media self-portraits.  We started the first day making color wheels called “color wheel of emotions” and talking about primary and secondary colors  as an exercise to help them practice for creating their self portraits during the week.

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RED: Red represents many things, but its essence is intensity and passion. Fire, blood, warmth, love, the heart, danger … red can symbolize of deep anger or sincere love. Red came to mind first when describing my experience in the first two days. I didn’t intentionally start with red, but I believe it came to my mind first because of the dichotomy I experience in a place and an event like this. I’m inspired by the people who serve this very hard community. I’m also deeply inspired by the artists who voluntarily and sacrificially join us to serve this week. My heart is deeply stirred and filled with HOPE. But my heart is also stirred with anger and hard questions. Why is there so much obvious hurt and poverty in one place?

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BLUE: Its essence is peace, but ironically can also represent sadness and melancholy. Perhaps a better description could be a place of stillness. It’s hard to be still like this. On the second night of I Am Art Camp, we had a great team meeting focused on worship and prayer lead by David  Lee (our music workshop leader) in which we centered on God and being still. I’m so grateful for people on our team that challenge me to be still, to engage in the moment and to listen to God’s voice. This is probably the hardest thing for me since I’m responsible for so many details of the camp. My mind is worn out, but I really want my heart to engage and heart God’s voice.

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YELLOW: Yellow is a fun and energetic color! I think this color best describes camp. The kids laugh and smile, genuinely engaged and there is great hope in their eyes. The students in my workshops loved experimenting various techniques and encouraged to one another. The counselors at camp are the teenagers who daily work with the younger kids. They have been very helpful in managing the students and assisting in the classrooms. We learned some of their stories of overcoming great obstacles and it is so inspiring to see them take on leadership responsibilities at such young ages.

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On the second day of camp and we focused on “Your World.” The kids explored and expressed their world through their projects and we also talked about their eternal home. My class created a pastel color project based on warm and cool colors representing their world. I found this cool project and it reminded of the mountains and sun of Guatemala!  The kids used various pastel techniques in their project: blending, etching and coloring. We talked about the emotions colors and lines can represent. I LOVED how these turned out! Even though they all look similar, each child created the project very differently. It is a perfect example and expression of our uniqueness in identity as art of the Great I Am!

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Hope for Guatemala

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On Sunday, November 9, 2014 we drove from Antigua to Zone 18 and found hope for Guatemala.

Driving from Antigua to Zone 18 is like driving from Brentwood to East Nashville. Antigua is a tourist town full of ancient history and beauty, while Zone 18 is a crowded slum with traffic, diesel fumes, gangs, murder.  Zone 18 is listed as one of the places NOT to go while visiting Guatemala.  We were driving in the crowded slum for a while when we turned into a driveway … to our surprise we had arrived at Hope for Guatemala.  We were told it was at a farm “una finca” near Zone 18.  We didn’t see farmland anywhere.  But, this was it.  The gate and wall were painted with a fabulous mural that reads, “the place were dreams are planted …”

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The gate opened, we drove in, and found we have come to an oasis in the middle of the city.  There were lush green trees and plants, bright orange flowers in the trees, and a view of mountains in the distance.  There were no stores, no crowded streets, nothing but the farm house, a few outbuildings, and rolling hills with tall trees as far as the eye could see. How could THIS be in the middle of THAT??

Jose, the director of Hope for Guatemala, told us the story behind this place. This finca was the largest egg farm in the country back in the 80s and early 90’s, and has been in the family for 140 years. His daughter was kidnapped and the family fled the country. The house has been abandoned since the mid 90’s.  A year and a half ago Hope for Guatemala discovered this place and God opened the door for them to move their ministry here.

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So now, kids who live with three families in a one room shack with no water or electricity can come to this beautiful oasis in the middle of the slum. They can play on awesome playground equipment and with the goats, horses and chickens. They learn to work the land and produce a crop. There is a lake to jump in and catch tilapia. None of these things would not even be possible in their “neighborhood.”

There is peace here. There is freedom here. There is safety, love, and family here. Who would have guessed we’d find a place like this in the middle of the slum. God has planted Hope for Guatemala here to provide such an oasis for this community. What a blessing!

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Excited, Nervous, But Mostly Excited to Empower Through Creative Arts

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Excited, somewhat nervous, but mostly excited to empower through creative arts.

That’s how I would describe my pre-trip status. I am constantly reminding myself that I am not in control, constantly thinking “Its not about me.” I see evidence all of the time that there is a bigger plan in place and I trust in that. I have been on several mission trips and been to foreign countries multiple times but something feels different about this trip. It feels like this time, its more real. It’s hard to believe that I will be in Guatemala soon. About a year and a half ago, I moved to California. I found myself in a city of 1,000,000 people and felt the most alone I have ever been. On top of that I was 3 days by car to any place I had previously lived. I had an overwhelming feeling that I needed to reach out and find a community that I could be of some use or at the very least a group of people where I wasn’t constantly introducing myself. Athentikos found me during this time. Paul Lowder, which was a band mate and friend, invited me to join up. After researching the organization and watching their documentaries, it became clear to me that this was an effort that I could support and this was my way to plug in to a new community where I could do some good. Who knew that I would find the people on the Internet and the place in another country? It’s a reminder that God is not bound by geography and his plan for us can’t be predicted.

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This team didn’t really know me me but took me in as their own to shine hope to a group of youth in Guatemala.

That’s beautiful to me. I have been working hard lately trying to develop a plan to engage with the children that will encourage them and I find that the more that I think about it, the more I get excited about what’s in store for them and me this November.

Please pray for us as we take this journey and if you can, please help us raise funds for all the logistical needs of putting on an Art Camp in Central America.

Peace and Love and Thanks, David

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Cross-Cultural Creative Arts

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We’re planning a cross-cultural creative arts project for Guatemala and Tennessee.

Julia and I are part of the Fall 2014 Athentikos I Am Art Team. We spent several hours the other day with Scott and Amelia collaborating and brainstorming art projects for our I Am Art workshop. I have been a little overwhelmed with the idea of having to come up with a curriculum for a 90 minute class each day. It’s great to have time with the kids each day without having to rush, but that’s a lot of time to fill! This trip requires time and effort, in addition to fundraising. That’s intimidating.  Yet, as the four of us came together, the projects came together as lots of ideas were honed and modified, and we developed a great plan for camp.  I don’t think we could have come up with it all individually, but together we made it great.  I can’t wait to see how it all plays out at camp!

I am realizing that because we are required to invest more in this endeavor, I am truly more vested in in it. We’re not just “showing up,” and being told what to do. We’re bringing an entire program, materials, and creative skills to the table. We are truly sharing some of ourselves this way. By sharing ourselves with the kids it becomes a shared experience between us and the kids.

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We’re neighbors with the Moore’s, so we have decided to hold a mini I Am Art workshop for the kids on our street. Our street is pretty special, and has really become an extended family. Next week, we will teach one of our lessons and help the kids with two art projects. I’m excited about the cross-cultural creativity. Kids on our street will start a project that we will take with us to be finished by Guatemalan children. We’ll also start a project in Guatemala for children in our neighborhood to finish, once we return home. It seems fitting to have a tight knit community like ours share with a similarly close community in Guatemala.

This collaborative, cross-cultural, creative experience with our community and the community in Guatemala is becoming a very rich experience – more than I expected … and we haven’t even left yet. I look forward to all that is in store!

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Creativity Takes Courage

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I’m heading to Guatemala again next month!

It’s hard to blog something new about my experience and our work with at-risk kids in Guatemala because I feel like I “talk” about it all the time! Yes, Guatemala has become part of our lives. What started as a life-changing journey to adopt our two sons has now evolved into a deep love for the country and connecting others to the need and the beauty there.

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“Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited to all we now know and understand, while imagination embraces the entire world, and all there ever will be to know and understand.” – Albert Einstein

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]Next month, my husband and I will lead our 9th team of 20 American & Guatemala artists to facilitate a week-long I AM ART camp with at-risk youth in Guatemala through our non-profit, Athentikos. Athentikos is a community of creatives collaborating in authentic mission. Our I AM ART initiative enriches the lives of at-risk children by using creative arts to show them the power of their true potential. Our team help kids discover the uniqueness of who they are and unlock the possibilities of what they can be. With I AM ART, our goal is to help each child find the art within so they can change the way they view the world around them. This changes their course. This changes their community.

Our team will be teaching 10 daily workshops for 100 kids in Guatemala City for a week. These range from drama, painting, collage, sewing, music and more. In addition to the workshops, the kids will learn daily Bible lessons, play games, sing songs and be loved-on by our staff! Then, we have a community art show at the end of the week to allow the kids to perform, show and communicate about their exploration and creations.

I teach a collage class which will be based on a self-portrait project.

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“Creativity takes courage.―
Henri Matisse

JOIN US in this opportunity! We offer this week-long camp for FREE to all the kids in attendance. Would you consider making a donation to help send a child to camp!? And as a small THANK YOU, you will receive a piece of art work from the camp![/vc_column_text][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]ajmoore_other_07

“Primarily what we carry around with us is a memory of childhood, back when each held the magic of discovering the world.” Isamu Noguchi

Children growing up in poverty often lack the “habit” of dreaming, of using their imaginations and thus understanding their own unique story. Their plight steals their imagination and in a sense their childhood. We believe through art, children can be challenged to explore and dream. Through I AM ART we have worked with a variety of youth to help them explore the world around them, connect with their communities on a different level and show them God’s truth through their own stories. Creativity really is the beginning of change.

I’ve loved seeing the impact art can have in a child’s life on a small and grand scale. This past spring we got to organize our first community mural project outside one of the largest slum areas in Latin America. Two hundred kids, adults and volunteers came together to produce a mural that proclaims The Right of The Child to their community. This grand project taught us all about the “simple” rights every child has: the right to a name, protection, family, home, food, medical attention, etc. The project also taught us about coming together to create something larger than ourselves and even beyond the project, that we all have something to contribute to the world. Many in the community thanked us and told us that projects like this can bring change to a community in addition to being a daily reminder to the kids that participated about their value and role in their community.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]Since the focus is on the kids in the communities, I often forget that a trip like this will have a profound impact on the adult American and Guatemalan staff & volunteers that are a part of the project. This year we have talked a lot about how this opportunity is now just for the kids, but exploration through art TOGETHER will have a profound impact on our artists. My hope is that I too will experience Guatemala and God in a new way. We are being more intentional about building and inspiriting our adult artist team through this opportunity. I hope is the artists in Guatemala and in the US can see how their gifts make a difference and will inspire them on a deeper level in their own art form.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″][mk_image src=”https://athentikos.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/ajmoore_mural_20.jpg” image_width=”300″ image_height=”300″ crop=”false” lightbox=”false” frame_style=”simple” target=”_self” caption_location=”inside-image” align=”left” margin_bottom=”10″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.”
Pablo Picasso
[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]“A painter should begin every canvas with a wash of black, because all things in nature are dark except where exposed by the light.”
Leonardo da Vinci

Art can be as simple as clapping your hands or as serious as putting your ideas into action. Art connects to the soul in a way nothing else can. We believe God uses this power to teach child about their own unique value. Even though almost all the kids we work with come from extreme poverty, have been abused and have very little educational opportunity, we believe along with the Guatemalan staff that work with them daily that these youth ARE the future of their communities and country. I AM ART is one piece of a very large organizational puzzle that will enable them to see their true potential.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]

Please give a donation today to make this happen!

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Artistas de Guatemala – I Am Art Fall 2014

On Thursday, October 2, we held an I Am Art meeting in Guatemala City for local artists.

It was an amazing meeting gathering some people who had expressed some interest in the I Am Art camp in November of this year. We had rappers, painters, designers, sculptures, musicians, etc. and all came with a sincere interest in exploring how they might use their talents and gifts to bless others.

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The host of the gathering was Vida Real church and their poverty alleviation initiative called I58. The director of the church’s radio program showed up and asked questions for a campaign that he plans to run sharing the I Am Art vision on the airwaves of the most listened Christian radio program in Guatemala City.

The first part of the meeting was filled with factual content about how the camp runs, the historical background that has lead to the use of art in personal and community transformation, etc. There were some great questions and the interest level of all involved seemed to increase at the time neared for the meeting to end. We concluded the time with a presentation of the short video made about the mural on children’s rights that was done in La Limonada earlier this year. It was then that something very special happened. Two university students sat and watched from the back of the room and it became apparent that they were being deeply touched by the narrative and images in the video. Both began to wipe tears from their eyes and I could see that something was whispering to their hearts as they watched.

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I approached them after the video was done and they expressed their deep passion to get involved. Both shared that they were in exams the week of the I Am Art camp but they would be doing everything they could to get some exams moved around so they could be as present as possible during the week. “We are committed and are willing to serve wherever there is a need,” they both said. I could see in their eye’s and in their gut wrenching honest expressions that the I Am Art vision had blown fresh wind under the wings of the creativity within them. “We love children,” they said, “and we can’t wait to help them love the art within them.”

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In addition to the interaction with these two young artists, there was also a woman who had agreed to come to the meeting per the invitation of a friend. This woman is an art teacher and has her own studio. Upon leaving the meeting she gave us her business cards and shared with us that she was committing herself to the vision. I learned later from an e-mail from her friend that not only had she committed to come herself, but was planning to invite several of her students to come and fully participate with her at the camp. Another woman I had met previously when her son played with us at a baseball clinic this past Summer. Rolando Monterroso learned she was an artist and designer and thus invited her to come to our meeting. She came not knowing what to expect but left committing herself to coming all week and leading one of the workshops. She asked if she could please bring her young son with her to be part of the week as well. Also present was a well known rapper/musician who lit up when we shared with him the idea of artist spotlight moments during the week. We asked him to consider being one of the artists for a spot light time sharing his skillz of lyrical calisthenics with the children. A big smile came over his face as he agreed but then asked, “can I bring some other rapper’s with me?”

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I left the session on Thursday morning with more excitement than I have felt for something in a very, very long time. Experiencing the emotions and energy coming from the artists sitting at round tables in the room that morning was completely worth the almost 2 hours it took me to get through morning rush hour to arrive at Iglesia Vida Real where we held the meeting. I can’t wait to see these artists and the ones coming from the U.S. pouring into the children of Zone 18 in November. It is going to be an incredible privilege to be a part of all that God has planned for that very special week!!

Joel Van Dyke

Reflections on I Am Art

It’s been several months since returning home from my first trip to Guatemala with the Athentikos team, and I can honestly say that it crosses my mind at least once a day.  I felt very strongly from the moment I learned about this trip that I couldn’t say no to an opportunity like this; an opportunity where I could share my love of art AND be used by God through the talent He has given me while working alongside children from La Limonada and 5 other beautiful and very talented women … on a mural – Sign me up!!

I only had an idea of what to expect and had seen a few pictures from previous trips, but God opened my eyes to something new each and every day.  So many things about the trip, so many people, captured my heart over the 10 days we were there for I AM ART.  How could they not?  The people of Guatemala are beautiful and the children are so full of hope.

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The students have been learning about their rights as children.  So, through the mural and workshops, we focused on ten basic rights: name, nationality, protection, love, education, recreation, food, housing, medical attention and family.  As a mama of three, it was, and still is, hard for me to grasp the fact that not every child is automatically raised in an environment where these ten rights don’t come naturally. But unfortunately, this is their reality. This created a deeper passion and love in my heart for the mural while painting with the children throughout the week.  Seeing their excitement and passion for art only fueled that love.  These fearfully and wonderfully made children sometimes have no food to eat at home, some have no place to lay their head at night, some are abused, they’re all surrounded by gang violence and looked down upon by other surrounding communities.  The art workshops and mural gave them a chance to escape their circumstances for a moment and simply be children.  There’s definitely something freeing and therapeutic about painting and creating, and it was evident through the smiles, laughter and fun I saw and felt through the children each day.  I also love how the mural adds a bit of sunshine to the community and will be a daily reminder that each child is important no matter their circumstance. Hopefully, every time they pass the mural, the children of La Limonada will feel joy knowing they played such a major part in creating it.

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A few of us also had the honor of visiting an extremely talented shoemaker and his family in La Limonada.  Otto had three others helping him make beautiful women’s flats in a small section of his home.  I stood in awe of how efficiently they worked with so little space and resources, and the quality of these handmade shoes.  A God-given talent for sure, and the smile and spirit that beamed from Otto’s face as he worked was pure joy.  I met his adorable daughter whose smile could light up any room, and his son whose somewhat quiet personality was full of respect and love.  I was excited to have a bag full of goodies to share, and it didn’t take long before more sweet children were slowly passing Otto’s door looking for the “Sticker Lady.”  I could’ve stayed there all afternoon passing out stickers and sharing a smile or laugh with those precious faces.  What a joy they added to my heart.

During our stay, Joel Van Dyke asked us to look for Jesus each day, and I found myself looking for Him in almost every circumstance.  The truth is, He was everywhere I turned.  He was in the beauty of the land, the smile of an elderly man passing us on the streets, the laughter of the children painting, the love and passion of the Lemonade International teachers and volunteers, the hope that is felt when you look over the slums of La Limonada.  Luke 6:20-23 says, “ 20 Looking at his disciples, he said:  “Blessed are you who are poor, for yours is the kingdom of God. 21 Blessed are you who hunger now, for you will be satisfied. Blessed are you who weep now, for you will laugh. 22 Blessed are you when people hate you, when they exclude you and insult you and reject your name as evil, because of the Son of Man. 23 “Rejoice in that day and leap for joy, because great is your reward in heaven. For that is how their ancestors treated the prophets.”  His love and wonder has no boundaries.  He’s there.

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I’m not certain the plans God has for me in the future, but I do know that He left my heart wanting to do more for La Limonada. Maybe it’s for our family to sponsor a child from there, for my daughters to raise money through a lemonade stand for the fall art camp or for me to go back again one day.  I’m hopeful that His plans involve all of the above. What I do know is that He sparked a passion for I AM ART and showed me the importance of this camp that can help these children express their emotions, surround them with encouragement and love and help heal their spirits through art.  I’m so very grateful that God led me to this opportunity and that I said, “Yes.”  I’m also honored that Athentikos allowed me to be a part of an incredible experience and their amazing team.

Amber Davis Greenway

The Official Fall 2014 I Am Art Team

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Introducing the Fall 2014 I Am Art Team

We’re blessed with an extremely diverse team this fall, including talent, age, and location. Our official team includes people from 6 states, with skills including theatre, dance, writing, collage, percussion, sculpture, painting, animation, quilting, scrapbooking, jewelry, spray paint, and art therapy.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]The Fall 2014 I Am Art US Team

Darlene Armendariz
Jenni Halterman
Julia Halterman
Cori Kiepke
David Lee
LeeAnn Love
Paul Lowder
Bobby Marko
Amelia Moore
Scott Moore
Heath Shackleford
Tammy Starr[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][mk_image src=”https://athentikos.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/I-Am-Art-Team-Square-02.jpg” image_width=”500″ image_height=”350″ crop=”false” lightbox=”false” frame_style=”simple” target=”_self” caption_location=”inside-image” align=”left” margin_bottom=”10″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][mk_padding_divider size=”20″][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/1″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]Our 2014 curriculum theme “Discovering Your Story” will help at-risk youth value their personal stories, open their eyes to dream beyond their current circumstances, and empower them with problem solving skills to achieve in life. We’re thrilled to journey with Hope for Guatemala and CTM Guatemala and impact the lives of Guatemala’s future leaders![/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][mk_padding_divider size=”20″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]

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